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RANDLTL

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NAME

randltl - generate random LTL/PSL formulas

SYNOPSIS

randltl [OPTION...] N|PROP...

DESCRIPTION

Generate random temporal logic formulas.

The formulas are built over the atomic propositions named by PROPS... or, if N is a nonnegative number, using N arbitrary names.

Type of formula to generate:

-B, --boolean

generate Boolean formulas

-L, --ltl

generate LTL formulas (default)

-P, --psl

generate PSL formulas

-S, --sere

generate SERE

Generation:

--allow-dups

allow duplicate formulas to be output

-n, --formulas=INT

number of formulas to output (1) use a negative value for unbounded generation

-r, --simplify[=LEVEL]

simplify formulas according to LEVEL (see below); LEVEL is set to 3 if omitted

--seed=INT

seed for the random number generator (0)

--tree-size=RANGE

tree size of the formulas generated, before mandatory trivial simplifications (15)

--weak-fairness

append some weak-fairness conditions

RANGE may have one of the following forms: ’INT’, ’INT..INT’, or ’..INT’. In the latter case, the missing number is assumed to be 1.

The simplification LEVEL may be set as follows.

0

No rewriting

1

basic rewritings and eventual/universal rules

2

additional syntactic implication rules

3

better implications using containment

Adjusting probabilities:

--boolean-priorities=STRING

set priorities for Boolean formulas

--dump-priorities

show current priorities, do not generate any formula

--ltl-priorities=STRING

set priorities for LTL formulas

--sere-priorities=STRING

set priorities for SERE formulas

STRING should be a comma-separated list of assignments, assigning integer priorities to the tokens listed by --dump-priorities.

Output options:

-0, --zero-terminated-output

separate output formulas with \0 instead of \n (for use with xargs -0)

-8, --utf8

output using UTF-8 characters

--format=FORMAT, --stats=FORMAT

specify how each line should be output (default: "%f")

-l, --lbt

output in LBT’s syntax

--latex

output using LaTeX macros

-o, --output=FORMAT

send output to a file named FORMAT instead of standard output. The first formula sent to a file truncates it unless FORMAT starts with ’>>’.

-p, --full-parentheses

output fully-parenthesized formulas

-s, --spin

output in Spin’s syntax

--spot

output in Spot’s syntax (default)

--wring

output in Wring’s syntax

The FORMAT string passed to --format may use the following interpreted sequences:

%%

a single %

%b

the Boolean-length of the formula (i.e., all Boolean subformulas count as 1)

%f

the formula (in the selected syntax)

%h, %[vw]h

the class of the formula is the Manna-Pnueli hierarchy ([v] replaces abbreviations by class names, [w] for all compatible classes)

%L

the (serial) number of the formula

%[OP]n

the nesting depth of operator OP. OP should be a single letter denoting the operator to count, or multiple letters to fuse several operators during depth evaluation. Add ’~’ to rewrite the formula in negative normal form before counting.

%s

the length (or size) of the formula

%x, %[LETTERS]X, %[LETTERS]x

number of atomic propositions used in the

formula;

add LETTERS to list atomic propositions

with (n) no quoting, (s) occasional double-quotes

with C-style escape, (d) double-quotes with C-style escape, (c) double-quotes with CSV-style escape, (p) between parentheses, any extra non-alphanumeric character will be used to separate propositions

Miscellaneous options:

--help

print this help

--version

print program version

Mandatory or optional arguments to long options are also mandatory or optional for any corresponding short options.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

If you would like to give a reference to this tool in an article, we suggest you cite the following paper:

Alexandre Duret-Lutz: Manipulating LTL formulas using Spot 1.0. Proceedings of ATVA’13. LNCS 8172.

EXAMPLES

The following generates 10 random LTL formulas over the propositions a, b, and c, with the default tree-size, and all available operators.

% randltl -n10 a b c

If you do not mind about the name of the atomic propositions, just give a number instead:

% randltl -n10 3

You can disable or favor certain operators by changing their priority. The following disables xor, implies, and equiv, and multiply the probability of X to occur by 10.

% randltl --ltl-priorities=’xor=0, implies=0, equiv=0, X=10’ -n10 a b c

REPORTING BUGS

Report bugs to <spot@lrde.epita.fr>.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright © 2018 Laboratoire de Recherche et Développement de l’Epita. License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it. There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

SEE ALSO

genaut(1), genltl(1), ltlfilt(1), randaut(1)